Injury

Rethinking Chronic Pain 

Rethinking Chronic Pain 

Is chronic pain caused by a malfunctioning pain system? Pain can be a frustrating experience, especially when the pain lingers after an injury has healed. This post will discuss the mechanism of chronic pain and how it can be treated conservatively. 

Preventing Injuries by Building Tissue Capacity

Preventing Injuries by Building Tissue Capacity

Preventing injuries is a difficult feat because there are so many different factors involved. Increasing the tissues capacity to tolerate load can help reduce the risk of injury. This blog post will define what tissue capacity is and the role it plays in rehabilitation and preventing injuries. 

Why Pain & Injury Aren’t Synonymous

Why Pain & Injury Aren’t Synonymous

We often think that injury and pain are synonymous. We experience pain when we sprain our ankle or accidentally hit our thumb with a hammer, which makes perfect sense. But does the presence of pain actually mean that there is always an injury to the tissue? This blog post will discuss the difference between pain and injury and why it is important. 

Why Mobility Doesn’t Fix Everything

Why Mobility Doesn’t Fix Everything

If you’ve suffered an injury in the previous two years, chances are someone has told you to do some sort of mobility work (foam rolling, lacrosse ball, stretching, etc…). Low back pain? Roll on it. Knee pain? Roll on it. Headaches? Uh, I guess roll on it. It seems like mobility work is the answer for every sports injury. This blog post will discuss why mobility work doesn’t fix everything and what you should be doing to prevent sports injuries. 

Can high chronic workloads protect against injury?

Can high chronic workloads protect against injury?

Predicting injuries is a very difficult task because there are so many factors that contribute to an injury. One of the most common causes is due to overuse. The term “overuse” is a poor term to describe these injuries because it implies that there is a certain amount of use that is optimal. A better way to describe these injuries is to describe them as a training program error, where the workload was increased too quickly for the body to adapt to. This blog post will discuss proper training programing and also how high chronic workloads can actually be protective against injury. 

Ankle Sprains: To R.I.C.E. or M.E.A.T.?

Ankle sprains are a very common injury. The most common mechanism is called an inversion sprain, where the foot rolls in. The RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation) has been a standard for treating ankle sprains. More recent research has pointed to the MEAT method (Mobilization, Exercise, Analgesics, and Treatment) as a more effective treatment method. This post will discuss the different treatment methods for ankle sprains.